100 Word Challenge: Change

This Sunday, in the U.S and Canada, Daylight Saving Time begins at 2 a.m. That means instead of sunset coming at 6 o’clock in the evening, it’ll come at 7. I like that. The downside is that to have that bit more light, means giving up an hour of my day.

With night falling so early, it seems like day is too short and I feel like I don’t have enough day to get everything I want to do done.

Back in the day, DST was created in the early 1900s as a fuel saving effort during World War I. Germany was the first country to introduce DST in 1916, then the United Kingdom and France. The U.S. adopted DST, or War Time as it was called, in 1918, but it wasn’t enacted as law until the end of the second World War in 1945.

DST became nationwide in the U.S. during 1966, originally running from April to October. It was extended to March-November in 2005 in response to the Energy Policy Act. Still, there are a few U.S territories that do not observe DST, including most of Arizona, Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

With that kind of illustrious history, you would think DST would be, not just time-honored, but respected. Eh… not so much.

Kids and their parents don’t like DST, because sometimes it means school bus pick-up time is barely light. Adults don’t like it because they come home from work in the dark. Then, just when you get accustomed to the time, it changes again. Circadian rhythms are disrupted, Seasonal Affective Disorder may be triggered, sleep deprivation in the winter, and work place accident increase in severity and frequency after time “Springs Forward.”

I have yet to hear from anyone that the semi-annual time change is happily anticipated. Most of my friends would like to see it abolished. Pick a time and stick with it.

Not much good about DST, in my opinion, but, that’s just me. Don’t forget to reset your clocks this weekend – the times, they are a-changing.

“The more things change, the more they stay the same.” ~ Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr

The word for this week is:

Change

Using “change” for inspiration, write 100 Words, no more, no less, then link back here, or leave your submission in the comment section. Remember to keep spreading the love with supportive comments for your fellow wordsters.

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Change

  1. […] Title:  Moving Day Prompt: Change Source: 100 Word Challenge – Thin Spiral Notebook […]

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  2. I love everything about that! You need to write more!!

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. […] weeks #100Words Challenge is: Change. What a great word, so many different stories play out in my mind! Hm, which one to go […]

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  4. […] one before #ThursThreads later. I was able to type up my response to the 100 word challenge from Thin Spiral Notebook last night, so here we […]

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  5. […] 1,000 words seems daunting, and you want to try your hand at something more compact, check out the 100 Word Challenge at “Thin spiral notebook.” Deadline for submissions is Tuesday, midnight […]

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  6. […] 100 Word Challenge! I’m really getting into these now, and I loved this week’s prompt: change. Change can mean so many different things to different people. It could be moving to a new school, […]

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  7. and, mine is up. 🙂

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  8. Change, it’s comin’. I kin feel it in my bones. The wind from the southwest just ain’t right, ain’t right at all. Winter’s behind that wind, and summer ain’t had a chance to show up yet. Death rides along, ain’t no missin’ its stink. Ain’t no avoidin’ it’s comin’. Locked doors cain’t protect ya. Not when death is out to getcha. We been cheatin’ death for too long and she’s collectin’ her due. Damn doctors and their damn experiments. Whole town of fools gettin’ what they deserve. Ayup. Change is comin’, and it ain’t good. Ain’t good at all.

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    1. This would be a wonderful lead-in for a longer piece. I really enjoyed the use of dialect, and you did it so well.

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      1. Aww shucks, Thank you.

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    2. wow! agreeing with Tara. Dialect is spot on. Would love to see what lies behind and before those words.

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      1. Never thought to write more, LOL. Thank you, Barbara. ❤

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    3. Wow, that’s really good!

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    4. That’s awesome! And now I’m dying to know more. Dialect is so tough to write but you made it look easy.

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      1. I’ve got this character in my head from reading Stephen King. I call him the Ol’ Maine Man. It’s his voice I hear when I write this dialect. Thank you!

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    5. Had me hooked Stephanie 🙂

      Enjoyed

      Ally 🙂

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